Should I Get Treatment?

Dr. Dan Shares His Insight on When You Get Treatment

Should I Get Treatment?

September 22nd, 2015 in Addiction
2 Comments

There are plenty of treatment facilities out there that are waiting for you to call and reach out for help today. But the real question is, should you get treatment for your substance abuse problem?
To answer that question you have to ask yourself these first:

1. Why are you abusing drugs or alcohol?

Many times people find themselves caught in a downward spiral of drug or alcohol abuse because they are self-medicating for an underling problem that they have. Self-medicating is finding a substance that helps the individual with a co-existing problem they are experiencing or had experienced in the past.
Those who suffer from depression may drink excessively when out with friends or smoke marijuana every day because it relaxes them after a stressful situation.
Traumatic experiences, bipolar disorders, and even social anxiety can cause people to seek out drugs that will help them cope with the burdens of these mental and physical problems. If this is the case, getting yourself into treatment will give you one on one time with a licensed therapist to discuss these problems and find healthy solutions.
Inpatient treatment programs often provide tailor made treatment plans that addresses your needs as well as help diagnose the possible underlining conditions that might be an important factor in your addiction.

2. Does your addiction to drugs or alcohol effect your life negatively?

No one grows up with the intentions of being an addict and often time’s drug and alcohol abuse starts off as something you tried for fun. Not something you decided to do long term or as a lifestyle choice. With prolonged exposure, you decided it helped you cope with difficult times in your life and because of your social circle or the way it made you feel you continued this path.
Usually people will seek treatment for their addiction because it has broken the bank and devoured their savings to pennies. Or maybe you found that your drug use takes up all your time and you no longer make time for your friends and family. Just maybe your addiction to meth or crack cocaine has left you toothless, underweight, and morals compromised to obtain the drug.
Regardless of your how drugs have effected your life, consider the quality of life you are living right now compared to what the quality of your life could be without the drug and determine for yourself if your life is worth getting off the drugs for.

3. Do you want a better life?

People think this is an easy question, of course you want to better your life, who wouldn’t? Understanding that your drug abuse does not focus you in the direction of a better life is important.
What if you wanted to travel to a different country or what if you constantly feel paranoid that the next time you go get your drugs, will be the day the authorities finally bust you for driving with drugs or under the influence. This could mean prison time with a felony on your record.
Did you always want to be a doctor but your heroin addiction gives you the shakes? Your life is worth getting treatment for if treatment is what you truly want.
If you have insurance and treatment is something you are interested in, many insurance companies cover rehabilitation with your privacy in mind.

4. Should you get treatment?

Your answers to the questions above should be able to answer this one. You do not have to label yourself an addict, you don’t even have to commit the rest of your life to sobriety or remaining clean for the rest of your life. If you think that your substance abuse has escalated to the point where you are in trouble with the law, stealing for your next fix, or destroying the relationships with your family and friends you might want to seek treatment. But it has to be something that you want to do to better yourself and your life.
Check out Dr. Dan Gallant’s video on getting treatment and see if treatment is something you really want.

2 Comments
  • Larry 18:16h, 11 October Reply

    It can seem scary to some but these places were designed to help. The staff there have the training and knowledge to help folks break the cycle that the average person just doesn’t have the know-how. If you need assistance, take it.

  • maddieshae 17:32h, 15 November Reply

    I don’t know that all addicts need treatment in the form of rehab, but I think attending AA meetings, (or whatever meeting suits you), counseling, etc. is important. Everyone is different and it depends on the person, so rehab may not be good for certain people. I definitely think it helps more people than not, though.

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