Alcohol

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Dangers of Alcohol Abuse

The point that drinking crosses over the line from social drinking to addiction, can sometimes be difficult to understand. Many times, people don’t realize that their drinking has become an addiction. However, there can be a point when social drinking becomes a problem and possibly leads to life threatening issues. Alcohol is an extremely physically and psychologically addictive substance.

Abusing Alcohol can lead to overdoses and other serious health problems, especially when combined with other drugs. Intoxication can impair brain function and motor skills; heavy use can increase risk of certain cancers, stroke, as well as kidney and liver disease. Alcohol abuse, which can lead to alcoholism, is a pattern of drinking that results in harm to one’s health, interpersonal relationships or ability to work. Every day people die from Alcohol related causes. Waiting to go into treatment is not an option for an Alcohol abuser.

Many people who drink everyday also make the mistake of drinking and driving everyday. The CDC claims that 28 people die every day in a car crash that involved an alcohol-impaired driver.

Street Names for Alcohol

Alcohol is most commonly referred to by its actual name. However, there are some well-known nicknames for it such as:

  • Hard Stuff
  • Sauce
  • Hooch
  • Moonshine

Regardless of what you call it, Alcohol is a very dangerous substance to abuse. If you think a loved one or yourself might be abusing Alcohol, it’s important to seek help.

Alcohol Effects

Consuming Alcohol may allow people to feel loose or social, but it can become a serious problem. There are many health side effects that can arise when drinking every day. Drinking Alcohol impairs your motor functions. As you become intoxicated, you may begin to slur your words or become unstable on your feet. While this might lead to an enjoyable night, abusing Alcohol is anything but enjoyable. You might do something or say something to someone that you will regret the next day, this can have horrible effects on your relationships and daily life. As tolerance goes up, so does the probability of blacking out. This can be very dangerous; you can hurt yourself or others. Addiction is complicated, and it can affect brain functionality in a variety of ways, leading to health and social problems.

Warning signs of Alcohol abuse
in a loved one

Alcohol addiction refers to a psychological and physical dependency on Alcohol. Individuals who suffer from Alcohol addiction may build up a tolerance, increasing the health and life consequences. Individuals who have relatives who have struggled, or struggle currently, with Alcohol dependency have a higher chance of developing an Alcohol addiction themselves. It can be hard to tell when a friend or loved one has a drinking problem, but there are a few signs you can look out for.

If you’ve gone out with your friend for a few drinks and he or she routinely ends up drinking way more, or the only way you friend likes to relax after a hard day is drinking, then they may have a dependence or addiction.

Another blatant sign is when someone blows off responsibilities to go drinking or is not able to fulfill obligations because they went out drinking the night before and are hungover. If you see anything of this nature, your friend might need your help. When people start to abuse Alcohol, they tend to only do things that will allow them to continue drinking. If you invite your friend to do things that will keep them from drinking and he or she continually turns these plans down, an intervention might be necessary.

If you’ve gone out with your friend
for a few drinks and he or she
routinely ends up drinking way more.

…or the only way your friend likes to
relax after a hard day is drinking,
then there might be a problem.

One of the biggest signs is when
your friend blows off responsibilities to
go drinking, or is not able to fulfill
obligations because they went out
drinking the night before.

Factual Dangers: Alcohol

Drinking every day can lead to many different health problems. Liquor is hard on the kidneys, damages the liver, and can create heart problems moving forward in life. Your eyesight can also start to diminish and your skin starts to wrinkle and dry out. You can also reach a point where you will not sleep well if you are not intoxicated, so that you constantly feel tired.

Every day people die from Alcohol related causes. Waiting to go into treatment is not an option for an Alcohol abuser.

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Fast Facts: Alcohol

In this section we will spotlight key facts about the featured substance.
The infographic series highlights the devestating effects that come with
substance abuse, not only for the user but everyone connected to them.

 

Alcohol Abuse is the Third Leading Lifestyle – related Cause of Death in the United States

Over time, excessive Alcohol use in the form of heavy drinking or binge drinking can lead to numerous health problems such as chronic diseases, neurological impairments, and social problems.

Alcohol Abuse or Addiction Can Lead to Breaking up Healthy Relationships or Straining a Family

Abusing Alcohol, or alcoholism, puts stress on the whole family. Other family members have to take on roles they normally wouldn’t to make up for what you can’t do while you are focused on drinking.

Drinking then Driving puts Yourself and Everyone Around you at Risk of Bodily Injury or Death

You might think that having a few drinks and driving can only hurt you, that if you get pulled over it will only to affect you. That may be true, but driving intoxicated multiplies the odds of a fatal crash, which endangers yourself and others.

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Alcohol Rehab Treatment

All kinds of people can struggle with alcoholism regardless of income, race or religion. It is classified as a progressive disease. This means that the habit will only intensify as time goes on if nothing changes with the addiction. It can be hard to make the choice to go into rehab, but it is the best way to stop abusing Alcohol. In Alcohol treatment, you will learn how to cope with challenging situations without drinking, while working on your mental health. During rehab, you will also participate in therapy sessions that will help with figuring out what your triggers are. Your treatment program should also include addiction education, which will explain how your brain has rewired itself.

Going through a rehab program will help you get control back over your life and teach you the proper ways to cope with stress, way that don’t include drinking it away. While you are there you will also learn how to interact with your family and start to rebuild the bridges that were burned during your addiction.

An addiction to Alcohol or Alcoholism will not go way on its own, it takes some work and is easiest to do while working with professionals. Choosing to go to rehab if a brave and courageous decision. Recovery is more than possible. It’s right around the corner and you are worth the work it takes to get there.

Alcohol Detox Treatment

Detoxing from Alcohol needs to be done in a facility. It is a central nervous system depressant, meaning it slows down your brain functions. During detox your body will be flooded with the chemicals that have been suppressed. This can be very dangerous. In most cases detox is required before treatment. Because of the risks associated with stopping a heavy drinking problem, medically supervised detox is normally required to insure patient safety. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms can begin showing signs in as little as two hours after their last drink with symptoms ranging from anxiety and shakiness to severe life threatening complications. Such complications include seizures and delirium tremens, also called DTs, which is a state of severe confusion and tremors.

While the withdrawal period can be extremely uncomfortable it is critical for a successful recovery. This is way it is recommended to detox in a facility. During a supervised detox, a medically trained staff will monitor and give you medication if it’s needed. This will keep you safe and as comfortable as you can be during the detox phase. Choosing an Alcohol detox program takes an understanding and effort on your part because you must know what your options are, that way you can make the best decision.

We can help. Call (866) 578-7471 and get the help you need to save your life.

Addiction to Alcohol

Addiction in a disease that needs to be treated. Having an addiction doesn’t make you a bad person, or show a moral shortcoming. It just means you need treatment. With a lot of people, becoming addicted to Alcohol happens gradually, most don’t notice there’s a problem until they are in the thick of it. This is partially due to the fact the Alcohol in socially acceptable. Alcoholism often has a lot to do with family history. Individuals who have relatives that struggled with Alcohol dependency have a higher chance of developing an Alcohol addiction themselves. While biology is a factor, alcoholism transcends all genders, races and age groups. Even if no one in your family struggles with addiction, if you are abusing Alcohol you still run the risk of becoming addiction.

If you think there may be a problem you need to seek help.  The best programs are those that are customized to your individual needs, but there are general treatment programs that last 28 to 30 days, 60 days and 90 days. There is always hope. Although the road to recovery may be a long and painful, there is help for Alcohol addiction and for lasting recovery. There have been many people who have been able to go into treatment and live a happy life in recovery.

You can join those people by giving us a call. We can help you through this.

Alcohol Dependency

When you first start drinking you might feel like the life of the party, but as the drinking turns into dependency there are a few things to look out for. Do you feel guilty or ashamed when you drink? Do you lie or hide alcohol from others? Do you black out or forget what you did while you were drinking? Do you regularly drink more than you intended to? If you answered yes to some or all of these, there is a good chance that you are dependent on Alcohol and need treatment. Becoming dependent on Alcohol means you need to drink in order to go on with your daily life. At this point you brain now thinks that it needs the Alcohol to survive. It is no longer a choice.

You are no longer drinking because you want to, you’re drinking because you have to. And if your life hasn’t already, it will spiral out of control. Once you are dependent getting treatment is your best option. It’s at this point that withdrawals become an issue as well. Call us and we can find you a detox and treatment center.  Withdrawals can start very quickly when Alcohol is taken away, your body has become dependent on t to function.

If you call us we can help you figure out when and how to get the treatment that you need. Once dependency has started, treatment is the best option to get your life back on track. Give us a call (866) 578-7471.

Seeking help for a loved one

  • When Do I know It’s Time for an Alcohol Intervention?
    When it comes to your loved ones, if you’re already asking yourself this question, it’s time to express your concern.
  • Do I Have to Conduct an Alcohol Intervention Myself?
    You never have to help someone alone. There are numerous professional interventionist services available.

Intervention for Alcohol Abuse

If you think your friend or loved one might have a problem with Alcohol abuse, know that you are not totally helpless. There are many people who have been in your situation and you have the ability to help him or her. Because alcohol is so socially excepted, it is an easy addiction to dismiss, yet one of the most dangerous addictions to let continue. It is easy and common for alcohol abuse to go on untreated. Your loved one might not even realize that there is a problem. Sometimes the line between social drinking and abuse can be blurred. If you have a loved-one suffering from alcohol addiction, you can help.

You can stage an intervention for them. You might be their only chance for sobriety. Sitting down and talking to your loved one in a caring way can be enough to get him or her into treatment. However, you have to be careful not to condemn them or make them feel attacked. Sometimes the best way to make sure this happens is to find an interventionalist who will help ensure that the intervention is executed in a positive way.  When doing this, remember that there is no such thing as a failed intervention. An intervention will help your friend, whether they decide to enter treatment right now or not. Sitting down and showing them the effects of their drinking, in a loving way, will help end their denial.

It might take a few tries before your loved agrees to go into treatment. The important part is that you have at least planted that seed. Call us to get help with planning an intervention the right way.

Recovery from Alcohol Abuse

It might seem far off in the distance, but recovery is possible. Many live happy, fulfilling lives in recovery from Alcohol abuse. You being here and reading this shows that, even if it is in a small way, you want that life. Living a life in recovery is within your grasp, you can have it, and it’s better than you can imagine. There’s a whole world out there waiting for you to discover after treatment.

During active addiction, you may have felt isolated, as if there was on one you could rely on to be there for you. In recovery, you will go to meetings and create life-long friendships with people who understand where you came from and where you are going. You’ll see that these bonds are extremely important to your recovery. You will make the type of friendships that will help keep you on the right track and these friends will be there for you when you feel like you might be floundering. Even better, after living in recovery, you’ll be there to help someone else see that this life is possible.

Recovery is anything but boring; it is fun and exciting. The recovery community is always doing something or going somewhere. This might seem impossible to you now, but you can have fun without drinking or doing drugs. You’ll learn to have fun while sober and you’ll try things that you might not even think of trying right now. It’s easy to get involved and make new friends. Your new life is waiting for you and you deserve to find it for yourself. Call us, recovery is waiting.

  • What Are Some of the Symptoms of Alcohol Addiction?
    Addiction is most often found in people to drink frequently and in large amounts, despite negative consequences.
  • What Treatment Work Best for Alcohol Addiction?
    While Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is usually the most effective, there are many other options available.
  • Can I Die from Drinking Too Much Alcohol?
    Yes. Alcohol poisoning can occur by drinking too much, leading to compromised respiration, coma, and even death.
  • What Are the Signs of an Alcohol Overdose?
    The common symptoms include frequent vomiting, mental incapacitation, labored breathing, and unresponsiveness.

Dangers of Alcohol Overdose

The longer your Alcohol abuse goes on without treatment, the more Alcohol it will take to not only get drunk, but to just keep the withdrawals at bay. Sadly, there will be a time when you have to drink just to get through the day and you won’t even be drinking for the intoxicating effect.

Once you get to this point, an overdose can be right around the corner. If you decide to drink until intoxication, you can overload your body with Alcohol. An overdose of Alcohol is also known as Alcohol poisoning. It is much more likely to happen as your tolerance builds up. Some of the symptoms of Alcohol poisoning are: not being able to stay awake, vomiting, and seizures. Passing out can be dangerous because if you vomit while you are unconscious, you could inhale the vomit and die of aspiration, similar to drowning. When you overdose on alcohol, you also run the risk of going into a coma.

While Alcohol poisoning isn’t the same type of overdose you might typically think of, it is still just as dangerous and life threatening. If you drink to this point, your motor and reasoning skills will become severely diminished, which puts you at a high risk of self-injury. A good example of this is driving while intoxicated; a sober mind knows this is a bad idea, but a few drinks in you might think that it’s fine. You are more likely to partake in other high risk activities as well. It’s never too late to get help, call us today and talk to an addiction specialist.

Alcohol Use, Abuse and Dependency

Alcohol is the most abused substance in the world for a variety of reasons, the main ones being that it is legal and readily available anywhere. It’s legality, and in turn, it’s availability paired with the fact that drinking is socially acceptable, contribute to why Alcohol addiction is so difficult to come to terms with.

Strictly put, Alcohol dependency is difficult to recognize and differentiate from common Alcohol abuse, as most of the signs can be brushed aside as regular use or blamed on others. Nevertheless, when it is abused there will come a time when Alcohol begins to take over your life completely, resulting in the need for professional help. But how can you possibly tell the difference between Alcohol use, abuse and dependency? It might seem hard, but there are some things you can look out for to help you tell them apart. Alcohol use differs from the other two mainly because one has complete control over how much Alcohol is consumed in one sitting. This can also be considered social drinking. It can be relatively harmless, if the person drinking does so responsibly. This is why Alcohol abuse and addiction is difficult to track; because of its frequent availability and social acceptance, figuring out and admitting that you have a problem can be tricky. In addition, American college life is often synonymous with binge drinking and the work environment is welcoming of after-work drinks to take the edge off a particularly stressful day. For many, admitting that there might be an issue can seem daunting, as one may feel weak or shameful. It’s important to understand that Alcohol consumption affects everyone differently. What may be okay for one person, may be too much for another. Addiction is a disease and there is nothing to feel ashamed about. Admitting you need treatment is a healthy step and is something to be proud off. Addiction is really as random as a toss of the dice. Some people can abuse Alcohol for years and never become dependent, while others may spend one night drinking and form an addiction. This is why its important to know the signs.

Typically, abusing Alcohol means that, unlike dependence, you can stop when you want to. In fact, contrary to popular belief, it is possible to only drink one day a week and still be an Alcohol abuser. The issue is what happens when you drink Alcohol, rather than the frequency of use. When you drink to excess and put yourself in dangerous situations, even if it’s on an average of one day a week, you are abusing Alcohol. Alcohol abuse is more about excess and the situations you put yourself in then it is about cravings and needing the substance. Another aspect of Alcohol abuse that is different than dependency is that, essentially, you are choosing to drink a large amount in a short time frame, otherwise known as binge drinking. Binge drinking is having 5 or more Alcoholic beverages in one sitting. It should also be noted that, although easier to overcome than dependency, Alcohol abuse is difficult to overcome on your own. The main difference between Alcohol abuse and Alcohol dependence is a matter of degree. Plainly speaking, how much one consumes and the reasons behind someone’s drinking factor into the differences between the two.

Alcohol dependency, otherwise known as Alcoholism, is a severe form of addiction that requires medical and professional attention to overcome. Someone who is dependent on Alcohol needs it to function on a normal level. Someone suffering from an Alcohol dependency will often have an abnormally high tolerance level, needing to drink a lot in order to achieve the same results as before. It’s a slippery slope from Alcohol abuse to dependency. When consuming so much Alcohol at one time, a tolerance will build up, and a dependency can develop. This happens when the body becomes physically addicted to a substance, leading to intense cravings and the presence of withdrawal symptoms when Alcohol is absent from the body. Withdrawal symptoms can include anxiety, sweating, nausea, tremors, and irritability. These symptoms can start as early as two hours after the individual’s last drink. Tolerance and withdrawal are both very strong and worrying signs of Alcohol dependence. Another telling sign is the inability to stop. No matter what is planned or intended, you cannot stop yourself from drinking too much, no matter how much you try. This doesn’t make you weak, it just means you need help. Regarding yourself or a loved one, if you already believe there is a problem, then chances are there is one. Whether you are only in the abuse phase or have developed a dependence, you have a chance at turning things around. Call us now and talk to an addiction specialist, we can help you figure out if there is a problem, and if there is we can get you the right amount of help needed to get your life on track again. Don’t be afraid to call, we know how difficult this is and will never judge your situation.

  • How Can I Tell if Someone is Drunk?
    cSome of the most common sign include mental impairment, slurred speech, vomiting and compromised balance.
  • How Long Does Alcohol Stay in One’s System?
    While each person metabolizes alcohol differently, it may take 12 to 24 hours for alcohol to leave the system.

Short-term effects

The effects of Alcohol can be seen almost immediately such as being intoxicated and slurring your speech, maybe even stumbling over your own feet. However, some effects last a little longer and will stick around after your night of drinking. The more you drink, the more severe the effects will be.

Hangovers caused by drinking too much, dehydration, and slower brain function, can be seen for days after a binge. You might also notice an upset stomach, diarrhea, and drowsiness. Not being able to get up or eat without feeling sick are good signs that you overdid it the night before. It’s also worth noting that just because you have a hangover does not mean that you have a drinking problem. It could just mean that for one night you went a little overboard. It’s important to note that if you are seeing that you have these symptoms more often than not or it’s happening more frequently than before, it is worth paying attention to. While these short-term effects will eventually go away, if you continue to abuse Alcohol more severe effects can take place.

If you are reading this then you can stop abusing Alcohol before it gets past these short-term effects. Call us, even if you have moved into long-term effects, we can help you get the treatment you need. It is never too late to get the help you need. Our addiction specialists have been in your shoes, or similar ones, and can understand what you are struggling with. Pick up the phone and let us help you before more damage is done.

Long-term effects

When Alcohol abuse or addiction continues the effects of it will worsen. The longer you drink the worse and worse these effects will get. People begin to have short-term memory loss, along with periods of black outs. Cirrhosis of the liver, liver failure, and kidney failure are direct effects of long term Alcohol abuse that can kill you. A major sign of liver or kidney failure is jaundice, or a yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes, as well as disorientation or confusion. This is caused by an overabundance of certain toxins in the blood that these important organs usually filter out of your system.

Damage to the central nervous system can also happen, such as: cognition problems, loss of hand eye coordination, tingling or numbness in extremities, and tremors. Heart problems such as heart attack and stroke are also correlated with alcohol abuse. These are effects that, for the most part, may not go back to normal once the drinking has stopped. That’s why it is important to get the treatment you need before it gets to this point. Malnutrition is another effect of long-term Alcohol abuse. This comes from a combination of not eating and the nausea that is induced by drinking too much. Your teeth may also begin to deteriorate. The acids from your stomach will wear down the enamel, causing a whole host of other issues along with it. Your immune system can become suppressed, causing you to become sick more often and for longer amounts of time.

You don’t have to let your drinking go on long enough to have these effects, you can get help today. Even if you have some of these long-term effects, it’s not too late to get help. It is never too late to find recovery, you don’t have to let these effects worsen, you can call us today. We can help you find the treatment you need. We will never judge you, we want to help you get your life back.

  • What Are Some of Alcohol’s Long-Lasting Effects?
    Some of most common health concerns include high blood pressure, liver disease, heart disease and stroke.
  • Can I Drink Alcohol If I am Pregnant?
    Numerous studies show that pre-natal alcohol use can cause permanent damage to the child.

It’s What They Need

Your loved one feels isolated and alone in their fight against their addiction. Give them the backup that they need. Holding an intervention for a loved one not only brings their problem to the surface, but shows them that people still care about them. They might be in denial with other people, but most people who have a substance abuse problem are not in denial with themselves. Deep down inside, they know they need help. If you show them that they have support if they decide to get that help, they will be more willing to go to rehab. Let them know that you are not giving up on them.

Find out More about your available options today  866 578-7471

Real Resources, Real Recovery.

Seeking help for a loved one

  • What Are the Benefits of Inpatient Treatment?
    Inpatient care removes the distractions of one’s daily life, allowing for a more complete treatment process.
  • How Long Should One Stay in Inpatient Treatment?
    According to studies, the recommend amount of time spent in treatment is 90 days.

Inpatient Alcohol Rehab

Inpatient treatment is a good idea for people who are abusing Alcohol. During inpatient treatment, you will live on site, away from the distractions and stresses of the outside world. You will get treatment there at the facility or you will be transported to your groups and meetings. This is beneficial because you are away from outside pressures and triggers, which will allows you to focus solely on recovery. Like almost anything, it can be difficult at times, but treatment will go smoothly once you get the hang of it.

During the first part of treatment, most facilities will limit your phone time and outside contact. The further you get along in your program, the more you will be able to interact with people outside of the facility. Limiting your contact with the outside can help your therapeutic process as well as give you time to focus on getting healthy again. This type of treatment has better odds of long-term sobriety than just outpatient treatment on its own does. Outpatient can work too, but it takes a certain personality for it to work as effectively as inpatient. Taking yourself away from your triggers allows you the time to learn what recovery means and how to live a life of sobriety before adding stress and real problems.

This will give you a solid foundation before coming face to face with any of these issues. Call us today and we can help answer all of your questions about inpatient treatment and what to expect. We can get you connected to an impatient facility that will give you the highest chance at long-term sobriety.

Outpatient Alcohol Rehab

Inpatient treatment is a good idea for people who are abusing Alcohol. During inpatient treatment, you will live on site, taking you away from the distraction of the outside world. You will get treatment there at the facility or you will be transported you to your groups and meetings. This is beneficial because you are away from outside pressures and triggers, which will allow you to focus solely on recovery. Like almost anything it can be difficult at times, but once you get a hang of it, treatment will go smoothly.

During the first part of treatment most facilities will limit your phone time and outside contact. Then the further you get along in your program the more you will be able to interact with people outside of the facility. Limiting you contact with the outside can help your therapeutic process as well as give you time to focus on getting healthy again.

This type of treatment has better odds of long-term sobriety than simply outpatient. Outpatient can work too, but it takes a certain personality to make it work as effectively as inpatient. Taking yourself away from your triggers and allowing yourself the time to learn what recovery means and how to live a life of sobriety before adding stress and real problems. This will give you a solid foundation before coming face to face with any of these issues. Call us today and we can help answer all of you questions about inpatient treatment and what to expect. WE can get you connected to an impatient facility that will give you the highest chance at long-term sobriety.

  • Inpatient Treatment Vs. Outpatient Treatment?
    While outpatient maintains a flexible structure, inpatient treatment is recommended due to overall quality of care.
  • Should I Consider Outpatient Treatment?
    If one has financial obligations or other demanding circumstances, outpatient care could be a more viable option.

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