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Dangers of LSD Abuse

Lysergic Acid Diethylamide, better known as LSD, is a powerful hallucinogenic chemical derived from Ergot. Ergot is a fungus that is found growing on rye grains. When this compound is extracted from the fungus the hallucinogenic properties are intensified and used for recreational purposes.

Like many hallucinogens, LSD causes a person to go on a trip where visual hallucinations distort the real world, colors can be heard, and sound can be tasted. Often, those who use LSD believe they experience a spiritual awakening.

However, bad trips have been known to occur just as often as good ones and the person is put into a constant state of fear as the hallucinations are often frightening and violent toward the individual using. LSD is a very unpredictable drug and a person can experience such an intense trip that they jump off a building because they think they can fly or commit suicide to evade the hallucinations of a bad trip.

Street Names for LSD

LSD has so many street names, many of which have long gone out of style. With its multi-decade popularity and tendency to promote creativity, the list of alternative names for LSD is certainly colorful. As LSD is soaked into paper, the name often reflects the image on the paper. Some of the more common names are

  • Yellow Sunshine
  • Mellow Yellow
  • Aeon Flux
  • Blotter
  • Dots
  • Paper mushrooms
  • Trips

LSD Effects

LSD is one of the most powerful mood-altering drugs. It one of the more famous hallucinogens, which are drugs that cause changes in perception, feelings, and thoughts. People who take LSD often report visual and auditory hallucinations, changes in sense of self and reality. Its effects are often associated or interpreted as spiritual experience. LSD works by essentially turning on all regions of the brain, whereas usually only a couple might be active at once. With all these regions alert at once, the individual has an experience often perceived as supernatural. Due to LSD’s mood-enhancing and effects on neurochemistry, some people believe that in undetectable doses, the drug can help treat mood disorders that cannot be treated by usual methods.

Warning Signs of LSD Abuse in a Loved One

The effects of LSD may make it one of the more easily noticeable drugs being abused by friend or family member. A person on enough LSD to evoke a psychedelic response will likely not be hard to spot. If the person has enough of a mind to attempt a cover up of the drug use, it could be difficult. Knowing what to look for when you suspect that a loved one is using drugs can be a challenge. Some general things to keep an eye out for are the following:

Your loved one might display childlike amazement at things usually not perceived as fantastic. LSD creates an intense high and lack of appropriate assessment of objects. The person may be moving slowly or quickly and taking at a different pace than normal.

LSD also affects the personality, energy level and emotions of users. The person may stay up all night and sleep through most of the morning. Since the drug causes an endorphin dump, the next day the person may have extreme depression and feel groggy or fatigued.

A bad LSD experience could truly be frightening. If the person is afraid of hallucinations, the response could be to run, hide or fight. If your friend or family member is in such a state, consider getting help immediately as the person is a danger to you and self.

Factual Dangers: LSD

LSD use can lead to some serious problems and health consequences. This mood-altering hallucinogen has great potential to kill. If you suspect a loved one is using LSD, consider staging an intervention immediately. LSD use signifies a serious problem that needs to be addressed for your friend or family member to live a happy, healthy life. Don’t hesitate to reach out to the individual. Getting treatment is the difference between life and death for most LSD users.

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Fast Facts: LSD

In this section we will spotlight key facts about the featured substance.The infographic series highlights the devastating effects that come with substance abuse, not only for the user but everyone connected to them.

 

In 2010, about one in seven (12.9%) youths aged 12 to 17 indicated that LSD would be “fairly” or “very” easily available

During 1993, 13.2 million Americans, 12 years of age and older, reported having used LSD at least once compared to 8.1 million in 1985, an increase of more than 60%

LSD is not a physically addictive drug, and it does not cause brain damage. Its toxicity level is very low, and there are no withdrawal symptoms due to continued LSD use.

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LSD Rehab Treatment

LSD is incredibly strong and users often do not take this drug as frequently as others. The effects of this drug are extreme enough to cause a significant chemical imbalance after use. Many people who use LSD are also users of other drugs, such as Alcohol, Marijuana, prescription pills and possibly more. The willingness to take LSD suggests a problem of relying on mind-altering substances exists.

Anyone regularly using LSD is encouraged to consider professional addiction treatment to explore the underlying issues behind his or her using. Most rehab centers are 12-step based. No matter where you go, you are not far from others who understand your situation. A proficient rehab program will include individual and group therapy. Individual sessions often include Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, CBT, which helps people identify and replace negative thoughts processes with healthier, more productive ones.

While in rehab, you will discover things about yourself, as well as get the necessary education surrounding the substance disorder. LSD does not have to continue to control your life any longer. Additionally, you will develop skills and tools to cope with even the hardest of times in recovery. Finding the appropriate treatment can be a challenge. If you are having trouble with finding the right place for you to get help we are glad to assist you.

LSD Detox Treatment

LSD does not generally require the user to enter a medical detox center. If, however, the person is having a bad experience with the drug, he or she should certainly find immediate medical attention. Psychosis, paranoia, panic and the feeling that your own mind is creating the worst possible situation and you can’t escape are not pleasant – or safe – for anyone involved.

Although there is an absence of the common physical detoxification and withdrawal symptoms, an individual that uses LSD may still experience repercussions of their use that must be dealt with. Repercussions generally include something called Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder. HPPD is a continuation of perception distortion, that last after a LSD trip has ended. Symptoms of HPPD often include depression, memory problems, suicidal thinking, anxiety, psychological dependence, schizophrenia, difficulty with creative thinking, mental confusion and a decline in one’s attention span.

With a medically assisted detox stage an individual will be able to tolerate and go through detox with a sense of ease and comfort. Medical experts can monitor heart rate, blood pressure and provide alleviating therapies to make the individual comfortable and feel safe.

Addiction & Dependence to LSD

LSD is not considered to be an addictive drug. This can be confusing, especially if you know someone who uses the drug often. It does, however, produce issues of tolerance for anyone who takes the drug more than once. Tolerance to LSD means that more of the drug is required to achieve the same original response or high. Eventually, no amount of LSD can produce the desired effect and attempting large doses often results in injury and death.

Although the drug is not physically addictive, people can still become emotionally and psychologically addicted to it. Commonly, people rely on mood and mind-altering substances to help ease the stress of social situations. Others might use such substances to overcome certain fears. Whatever the case, a person can easily become addicted to a drug like LSD without the physical component. Without the drug, the individual likely feels nervous, uncomfortable and generally unable to participate in activities like he or she can while on the drug.

Whether addictive or not, repeated LSD use can cause serious damage and should incited concern. Use of LSD just once can cause severe brain damage, organ damage and death. LSD is not a benign drug. If a friend or family member is using LSD, reach out for help. The individual’s willingness to take LSD suggest an underlying problem that should be addressed. Getting your loved one the help he or she needs could mean the difference between life and death.

LSD Dependency

LSD is an unusual drug. For this drug, the symptoms of withdrawal do not have the same meaning or understand that other drugs have. Drugs like Opioids and Stimulants are very addictive, while LSD is not considered addictive the drug can quickly lead to tolerance. Tolerance is developed due to the dopamine released. Although LSD may not be as addictive as other drugs, the withdrawal symptoms are common and can lead to severe mental health issues, such as depression.

LSD is such a powerful substance that one use can cause a week or more of symptoms due to the lack of the drug. The brain cannot produce the amount of neurochemicals that it does while on LSD on a regular basis without severe injury. This means that taking another dose of LSD to combat the withdrawal symptoms is not likely to have the effect of the first dose.

Withdrawal symptoms from LSD can be severe. Depression, anxiety, mood issues, sleep disturbances, appetite changes, muscle twitches, pain, and lethargy can all range from mild to severe. People have committed suicide due to the severe depression experienced after taking LSD. Another potentially devastating effect of LSD is persistent psychosis, known as hallucinogen persisting perceptual disorder. In such cases, a person can continue to experience such disturbances as hallucinations and other distortions of reality.

Seeking help for a loved one.

  • Who Do I Include in a LSD Intervention?
    It is best to include an intervention specialist and those closest the LSD addicted individual. It is best to leave out anyone who may not be able to control their anger.
  • What Do I Say in A LSD Intervention?
    You will speak directly to your loved one, only speaking in love and concern while leaving out judgment or anger. Let him or her know the negative impact their LSD addiction causes you.

Intervention for LSD Abuse

When a loved one is using drugs, it can seem like nothing is known for certain. People in active drug use often lie about their use, where they are spending money and time, and start hanging around new acquaintances. LSD is a powerful drug that can cause some equally serious health consequences. If you suspect that a friend or family member is using LSD, consider staging an intervention. Using LSD is extremely dangerous, which makes time of the essence. Staging an intervention as quickly as possible can mean the difference between life and death.

An intervention is basically just a conversation where the person using is confronted. This pointed conversation is not based on blame or accusations, but love and concern. Anyone who feels attacked will defend him or herself and not remain open to others’ opinions. It is vital that you remain supportive an understanding during the intervention for it to be successful. There are many different methods and models of intervention. A professional interventionist can help you decide on how best to proceed. Some interventions are one person and the individual using. Other interventions include many people present during the event. Determining who and how many people should attend is one of the benefits of consulting with a professional.

Keep in mind that addiction is a disease and not a moral failing. The person using LSD, and possibly other substances, needs your love, support and help. Get started today and stage an intervention before it is too late.

Recovery from LSD Abuse

No matter how bad things have gotten, there is always hope for recovery. Fractured relationships and a life stuck in a cycle of drug use is no way to live. Recovery is possible. Many people find the help of professionals to be instrumental in helping them find a better way to live. Most rehab centers, however, are 12-step based and encourage further attendance at 12-step meetings after people have completed the rehab program. Not everyone is able to attend a rehab program, yet there is hope for recovery for them as well.

Many 12-step programs have cropped up and now cover just about every area of substance abuse. These 12-step meetings exist across the country and the globe. No matter where you are, most likely, you can find a meeting nearby. Millions of people have recovered from substance abuse with the help of these 12-step programs and the steps. The 12-steps are simply suggestions for how to live a better, happier, and freer life. Anyone with the desire to stop using mood and mind-altering substances is welcome to attend. People starting down the round to recovery are encouraged to attend meetings on a regular basis.

Members of a 12-step program or group are also encouraged to find a sponsor. A sponsor is a sober member of the group who has already worked the 12-steps. He or she will act as a mentor and friend and guide you through the 12-steps. If you are suffering and have a problem with drugs or Alcohol, find a meeting in your area today and get started living a better life.

  • How Do I Recover from LSD Addiction?
    The first step in recovery from your LSD addiction is admitting you have a problem. Once you have done that, reach out for help and seek detoxification and treatment center.
  • Will I Ever Relapse on LSD?
    LSD relapse is always possible. As long as you learn from it and move on in a positive direction you should be fine and able to have a strong and lasting recovery in the future.
  • Can I Overdose on LSD?
    You can honestly overdose on any drug if it is being abused.
  • How Do I Prevent a LSD Overdose?
    The only way to prevent an LSD overdose is to stop abusing the medication. If you are prescribed LSD and you are taking the dosage exactly how the doctor prescribed it, you should be okay.

Dangers of LSD Overdose

LSD is a particularly powerful Hallucinogen. It was first synthesized in Switzerland in the late 1930s. Originally, scientists were looking at LSD’s potential to treat psychiatric conditions. However, within only a few decades, the drug was outlawed in most Western countries.

LSD is closely tied to the counter-culture revolution of the 1960 and 70s in the United States. The hippy generation praised the drug for its perceived spiritual qualities and feelings of expansion of consciousness. This drug’s influence can be seen throughout the art and music of this era in American history.

The United States military shared in the interest in LSD. It was given to soldiers to determine its effects in search of a plausible mind control agent. Highly publicized and criticized projects, such as MKUltra, helped push LSD into legendary status in popular culture.

Attitudes toward LSD has begun to shift in some areas of the medical community. Drugs such as LSD were classified as illegal before much of the progress had been made in technology and research regarding medicine and our understanding of the human brain.

A new study was conducted by the Imperial College London. The aim of the study was to reveal how and why LSD affects the mind, essentially, to further our understanding of the drug and of consciousness itself.

LSD has long been thought to create spiritual-like experiences and alter consciousness in the direction of universal belonging. The goal of the study was to explain why a person would have such experiences with scientific data.

The results were outstanding. The government ban on the drug essentially halted any research of it for fifty years. Better late than never.

LSD Use, Abuse and Dependency

LSD is a particularly powerful Hallucinogen. It was first synthesized in Switzerland in the late 1930s. Originally, scientists were looking at LSD’s potential to treat psychiatric conditions. However, within only a few decades, the drug was outlawed in most Western countries.

LSD is closely tied to the counter-culture revolution of the 1960 and 70s in the United States. The hippy generation praised the drug for its perceived spiritual qualities and feelings of expansion of consciousness. This drug’s influence can be seen throughout the art and music of this era in American history.

The United States military shared in the interest in LSD. It was given to soldiers to determine its effects in search of a plausible mind control agent. Highly publicized and criticized projects, such as MKUltra, helped push LSD into legendary status in popular culture.

Attitudes toward LSD has begun to shift in some areas of the medical community. Drugs such as LSD were classified as illegal before much of the progress had been made in technology and research regarding medicine and our understanding of the human brain.

A new study was conducted by the Imperial College London. The aim of the study was to reveal how and why LSD affects the mind, essentially, to further our understanding of the drug and of consciousness itself.

LSD has long been thought to create spiritual-like experiences and alter consciousness in the direction of universal belonging. The goal of the study was to explain why a person would have such experiences with scientific data.

The results were outstanding. The government ban on the drug essentially halted any research of it for fifty years. Better late than never.

The study was conducted in Great Britain where the experiment could be done legally. It consisted of administering an IV dose of LSD and recording its effects via three different brain scans. The images of the brain on LSD look remarkably like the colorful artwork of the hippy generation.

The effect that LSD has on the brain is nothing short of magnificent. The brain in its entirety seems to light up at once.

One of the researchers, Robin Carhart-Harris said that “we saw many more areas of the brain than normal were contributing to visual processing under LSD, even though volunteers’ eyes were closed.”

He went on to describe the volunteers as “seeing with their eyes shut.” These visual experiences, were being seen not as coming from reality but from the imagination.

The brain and all its separate regions seem to be working as one while under the influence of LSD. Normally, the brain’s different neural regions work separately and will be activated one or a few at a time. LSD caused basically all the lights in the house to be turned on at once.

The results of the study show a drastic change in the brain’s normal patterns of neural processing. The unified and simultaneous activity of the entire brain explains the drug’s effects. Feelings of oneness with the universe, increased belonging and expansion of consciousness all make perfect sense in light of the study’s results.

“We are finally unveiling the brain mechanisms underlying the potential of LSD, not only to heal, but also to deepen our understanding of consciousness itself,” according to contributor to the study director Amanda Feilding of the Beckley Foundation.

In the aftermath of this breakthrough study, the conversation around LSD’s potential for treatment is back on the table. It is being proposed as a possible treatment option for those suffering from severe mood disorders and for whom nothing has worked.

This study has proven the power of LSD and created sincere interest in what it can do for severe and deep-rooted conditions such as depression, anxiety and addiction. Persistent moon and mental disorders can sometimes be caused by entrenched thought processes that cause the symptoms to resist normal methods of treatment. LSD potentially could act as a bulldozer and swiftly remove such mental road blocks by throwing all neural processes into action. The newfound outlook on life experience while under the drug’s influence is thought to potentially create long-lasting, new and healthy thought processes.

The use of LSD as a treatment option is nothing like what is seen in raves and parties, however. The idea is for someone to take exact, and likely minuscule, amounts of the drug under tightly controlled conditions.

Despite its positive potential, LSD maintains its silent threat to anyone who dare use it. For starters, drugs like LSD, which are produced in clandestine labs, are not reliable and extremely risky. It could be cut with Heroin, Cocaine, or lighter fluid. You just never know.

In addition to the ingredients, the dosage of LSD per pill or square or drop is a complete gamble. You could be getting a fatal amount or essentially nothing. Until the United States realizes the potential for this illegal substance to treat life-threatening illnesses, it seems better to err on the side of caution.

Yet, despite its illegal status, some psychiatrists have proven willing to suggest it to patients with extreme and untreatable mental and mood problems. Anyone considering this option should certainly only do so under the supervision of a medical professional.

LSD still has great potential to harm as well. LSD itself can cause life-long problems, including brain damage and other mental problems from even one use. There are possibly more risks than benefits for most people. Only those who have tried everything and are on the verge of giving up try LSD for good reason.

  • What Will I Work on in Individual LSD Therapy?
    You will work on yourself. Individual LSD therapy focuses on bettering your life in ways you never thought were affecting you.
  • What is Individual LSD Therapy?
    Individual therapy is where you would meet one-on-one with a therapist in a confidential setting to talk about your LSD addiction.

Short-term Effects

LSD is a hallucinogen that starts working approximately half an hour after ingestion. It can last for 6 to 12 hours. As with all street drugs, the actual contents of the LSD, as well as the dosage are inconsistent between sources. LSD induces an extreme neurological response. Studies have since shown how LSD affects the brain through MRI and CT scans. This drug causes simultaneous activation of much of the brain, resulting in areas of the brain working together that are usually only activated separately and at different times.

Many people, however, experience a distorted sense of time, space, and their identity. Hallucinations and delusions are the hallmark of LSD. People also experience changes in vision, including an altered depth perception. Other effects of LSD include a loss of appetite, sleeplessness, lack of coordination, changes in mood and emotions, such as fear, euphoria, anxiety and panic attacks. People may experience an increase in attachment and feelings of closeness to others. Some react to LSD badly, experiencing fear, anxiety, psychosis, paranoia and an intense delusional state.

LSD may possibly the cause of several short-term side effects. The level of severity often depends on the individuals as well as, LSD usage or abuse history. LSD short-term effects often include rapid emotional swings, reality distortion, insomnia, interpersonal difficulties, extreme depression, weakness, high body temperature, increased heart rate, dry mouth, thirst, enlarged pupils, tremors and sweating.

Long-term Effects

The exact nature of long-term effects of LSD are not fully understood. People can have dramatically different long-term reactions to LSD. These persistent effects caused by LSD is only one part of the puzzle. As LSD may be combined or cut with any number of substances, those additives also have their own long-term consequences.

Individuals experience a countless amount of disturbing effects produced by LSD, but, if using continues the consequences could be devastating. Some of the long-term consequences are flashbacks, Hallucinogen-persisting perception disorder, mood swings, depression, paranoia, disorganized thinking, and insomnia. Other potential issues after taking LSD are flashbacks.

Hallucinogen-persisting perception disorder, or HPPD, is an aggravated form of flask backs and may include continued distorted perceptions and sensations. HPPD can affect a person’s ability to function normally. Daily flash backs are possible, complete with distorted visual perception and hallucinations. Some people experience such severe depression and such violent mood swings that they must be hospitalized. Worst case scenarios have also occurred, where a person has committed suicide because of post-LSD use depression.

Mood changes, disorganized thinking, paranoia, and visual disturbances can all be categorized as persistent psychosis. The person’s mental function never really returns to normal. Sleep disturbances are another long-term effect. The person may have trouble sleeping or falling asleep, possibly years after.

  • Will Group Therapy Help My LSD Addiction?
    Yes. Group therapy will show you that you are not fighting your LSD addiction alone.
  • What Do I Do in LSD Group Therapy?
    In group therapy, you will talk about your LSD addiction and relate with others’ battle with their addiction.

It’s What They Need.

Your loved one feels isolated and alone in their fight against their addiction. Give them the backup that they need. Holding an intervention for a loved one not only brings their problem to the surface, but shows them that people still care about them. They might be in denial with other people, but most people who have a substance abuse problem are not in denial with themselves. Deep down inside, they know they need help. If you show them that they have support if they decide to get that help, they will be more willing to go to rehab. Let them know that you are not giving up on them.

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Real Resources, Real Recovery.

Seeking help for a loved one

  • Why Should I go to Inpatient Treatment for My LSD Addiction?
    You should go to inpatient treatment to save your life from LSD addiction. You will learn a new, healthier way of life while in inpatient rehabilitation.
  • Why Should I Attend Inpatient Rehab?
    You should attend inpatient rehab for your LSD addiction so you can learn how to live your life in a positive way without the use of drugs.

Inpatient LSD Rehab

Drug use suggests that the person has an underlying problem. Anyone willing to risk his or her own life may need professional help. Additionally, people can develop a psychological or emotional addition to the drug. Whatever stage of drug use the person is in, inpatient treatment is the best way to treat him or her. Inpatient rehab facilities have the best track record when it comes to helping people stay clean and sober for life.

Inpatient facilities are where patience stay in a facility for a period, typically for 30, 60 or 90 days. These residential treatment programs provide housing, meals and transportation. The benefit of staying in a residential facility is that it removes the individual from the environment that led him or her to use. Old using friends, enablers and dealers are all removed from the picture. The stress and contentious relationships are all stopped the moment the person steps into an inpatient rehab facility. Inpatient rehabs offer the most intensive and comprehensive addiction treatment. These facilities provide around the clock supervision and support. Often, there are two stages of treatment. The initial stage is detox or stabilization, followed by PHP.

Through individual, group and family therapy sessions, each client can make an enormous amount of progress. These programs allow people to focus on their recovery and healing while the rest is taken care of by staff. Whatever the person’s specific needs, an inpatient treatment center is likely to provide the necessary care.

Outpatient LSD Rehab

Outpatient treatment programs offer similar therapies and treatment regiments, however on a part-time basis. An outpatient program is where the clients travel to a clinic several times a week to take part in treatment sessions and then leave, rather than living at a facility. This form of allows the patient to work, attend school, or go about their life as normal.

With outpatient treatment, the individual seeking recovery is still exposed to the environment that originally contributed to his or her addiction. Inpatient rehab better serves those new to sobriety by isolating him or her from the environment. However, inpatient rehab is not an option for many people due to monetary, time and travel constraints. In such cases, outpatient treatment can work wonders.

Outpatient rehab also provides individuals with the support and guidance necessary to finding a better way to live. Group and individual therapy sessions help clients recover from trauma and uncover the underlying reason that led them to use. Some outpatient programs also offer family therapy and other methods of healing. Make sure to research treatment centers before you commit. Most rehab centers are 12-step based because this program of recovery has been proven effective. These programs have helped millions successfully recover from mood and mind-altering substances. Once you have completed outpatient you will need to stay connected to a sober community. 12-step programs have meetings in just about every city and town across the United States.

  • Will Outpatient Help my LSD Addiction?
    Just like inpatient, if you are willing to do what it takes to recover, outpatient rehab will help you learn how to live your life without LSD.
  • When Should I go to Outpatient Rehab?
    Following up your inpatient treatment with outpatient rehab can help provide you with a better chance at LSD recovery.

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