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Dangers of Vicodin Abuse

Vicodin is one of the most commonly prescribed painkillers in the United States. In 2013, 250 million Opioid prescriptions were dispensed, according to the Centers for Disease Control, CDC. That’s enough prescriptions for every adult in America to have his or her own bottle of pills. The most commonly prescribed Opioid is Vicodin.
Vicodin abuse has become extremely prevalent today. People start taking the drug after receiving a prescription from a doctor for an injury or post-op. What people often do not know is that Opiate based narcotics are extremely addictive. Even when taken as prescribed, there is a possibility to develop a chemical dependence.
The effects of Vicodin on the mind and emotions are equally addictive. Because it relieves stress, eases emotional pain and creates euphoria, many people start taking it more often and in larger doses than prescribed. Before the person thinks possible, he or she is in the grips of addiction. Prescription Opiate addiction frequently progresses to other, stronger Opiates, such as Heroin. This progression is now, sadly, common.

Street Names for Vicodin

Vicodin is a commonly traded drug by illegal means. When the demand is high, the supply will follow. Vicodin may be called by its brand name, its generic name, hydrocodone, or any of these street names:

• Vikes

• Vicos

• Hydros

• Norco

• Tabs

• Watsons

• 357’s

• Scratch

Vicodin Effects

Vicodin is the brand name for Hydrocodone and Acetaminophen combination drug. The dose of Hydrocodone and Acetaminophen in Vicodin is dependent on the prescription, but a commonly prescribed strength pill contains 5mg of Hydrocodone and 500mg of Acetaminophen. Both the drugs contained have an effect on the user. Common side effects of Vicodin include mood swings, depression, panic attacks, anxiety, general agitation, insomnia, night sweats, irregular heartbeat, constipation, skin rashes, dizziness, nausea, and cognitive difficulties. Vicodin is a central nervous system depressant and, as such, has a generally sedating effect. One of the most dangerous side effects of Vicodin use, however, is its propensity to cause addiction and dependency. Vicodin is a dangerous and powerful, despite its prevalence.

Warning Signs of Vicodin Abuse in a Loved One

Many people are initially given Vicodin as a pain management program, either for short or long-term use. It can cause physical dependence in less than a week and it not only dulls physical pain, but psychological and emotional pain as well. A person can be psychologically addicted, but not physically, however that is rare. There are many different psychological, mood, physical and social warning signs that point to an addiction to Vicodin. A few of these are:

Using Vicodin after the pain has subsided is a sign that something is wrong. If the person is behaving differently toward Vicodin than say, blood pressure medicine or a non-mood-altering drug, then he or she may have become addicted to the drug.

Increasing the dose is a sign of tolerance and addiction. If your loved one needs more and more of the drug for it to work effectively, there is a problem.
The best thing to do is suggest stopping the drug immediately.

Another sign of a drug problem is doctor shopping, or obtaining a prescription from multiple physicians. This is essentially using doctors and surely lying
about the amount being used. Such secretive behaviors are a tell-tell sign of addiction.

Factual Dangers: Vicodin

Vicodin is a powerful drug. Don’t let its prevalence fool you. Vicodin abuse, dependency and addiction are dangerous. Millions of people have become addicted to prescription painkillers, and usually faster than they thought possible. Vicodin is the most common prescription abused and has a high rate of addiction in legitimate users. It has cost many their lives and ruined the lives of many more. These are some dangers associated with Vicodin addiction:

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Fast Facts: Vicodin

In this section we will spotlight key facts about the featured substance.The infographic series highlights the devastating effects that come withsubstance abuse, not only for the user but everyone connected to them.

 

Almost 23,000 individuals across the United States engaged in the recreational use of Vicodin, according to the 2008 National Survey on Drug Use and Health

In 2009, surveys revealed that 16 million Americans age 12 and older had used a prescription pain reliever for nonmedical purposes at least once in the year

In 1998 physicians were writing over 56 million new prescriptions for hydrocodone products like Vicodin
and by 2000 over 89 million were written.

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Vicodin Rehab Treatment

Vicodin is one of the most commonly prescribed and abused prescription medications. There has been a significant increase in prescription drug abuse and addiction in recent years. Many people start taking Vicodin without realizing just how addictive it is. In fact, some physicians prescribe this drug for pain management over a span of years. For people with chronic pain, living without narcotics can be a frightening thought. However, a life enslaved to drugs is no way to live. Addiction is a progressive and deadly illness and anyone who has become addicted to Vicodin should seek inpatient drug rehab to overcome their disease.
Inpatient rehab is considered the most effective way to address prescription painkiller addiction. Some treatment centers have special programs for those dealing with chronic pain. There are also programs for those who started out with a legitimate pain problem, which subsided while the compulsion to use narcotics took over their lives. These are common stories, unfortunately. However, that just means that many have helped pave the path and discovered what works in addiction treatment.
The professionals in a rehab facility will help you identify and address the reasons that lead you to use. You will learn a better, healthier way to live and, as a result, the life you always wanted is yours for the taking. Get started today.

Vicodin Detox Treatment

When people become addicted or dependent to Vicodin, they often need a medically monitored detox program to ensure their health and safety. Detox is the most intensive stage of treatment and includes the most medical procedures and therapies. This is because of the nature of detoxing off drugs and Alcohol. When a person becomes addicted to Vicodin, his or her body and brain chemistry changes. The system comes to rely on the presence on the drug to function. When the drug is removed, the brain and body must readjust its settings to accommodate the new circumstances. This adjustment phase results in withdrawal symptoms, which can be dangerous and unpleasant.

One way to stop using is to slowly taper off the drug. However, withdrawal can be painful and potentially dangerous and, as a result of the discomfort, people often relapse before fully detoxing. For this reason, anyone who wants to stop using Vicodin should consider entering a medical detox facility. Such a facility offers cutting edge treatments as well as around the clock supervision and support. Medical professionals help you detox safely and as comfortably as possible, allowing you to relax knowing that you are in good hands.

Additionally, many facilities offer group activities to help you progress in your recovery as well as pass the time. Many detox centers will also provide therapy to help you begin to identify the underlying issues of your addiction.

Addiction to Vicodin

Vicodin addiction can happen to anybody. There has been a significant growth in prescription drug addiction over the past few years, spanning all age groups and all demographics. Many people do not reach out for help due to shame or guilt. These should not impede anyone from getting the help he or she needs to combat Vicodin addiction. Vicodin is one of the most commonly prescribed and abused prescription drugs.

Sometimes, Vicodin abuse is done for recreational use and this usually points to a younger age group. There is also a significant number of people who become addicted to Vicodin through legitimate means. Usually, people who start off with a legitimate prescription and become addicted, the drug’s euphoric and emotional relief causes them to continue to use after the physical pain is gone. This is known as self-medicating and can lead a person to use harsher and harder drugs to the point of death.

There are many different psychological, mood, physical and social warning signs that point to an addiction to Vicodin. A few of these include continuing to use after the pain has subsided, increasing the dosage, doctor shopping or obtaining a prescription from multiple physicians, secretive behaviors, such as hiding use, and other negative behaviors. Denial is a significant problem amongst all people addicted to Vicodin, especially if the person obtained the drug through legal means.

Vicodin Dependency

Dependence to Vicodin is a scary place to be. Dependence is similar to addiction in that the person’s life is severely altered by his or her relationships with Vicodin. The difference is that once dependent, the person seeks the drug simply to feel okay or normal and no longer experiences the high that originally got the ball rolling. When a person takes Vicodin or any painkiller, his or her body will start to develop a tolerance toward that substance. When such a tolerance is built, he or she must take a higher and higher dose in order to obtain the desired effects. Some people will start to combine Vicodin with other substances to counteract the tolerance. It is also very important to understand that combining Vicodin with other types of medication or drugs, including alcohol, creates significant risk and could possibly prove deadly.

Vicodin dependence is extremely dangerous – and expensive. On average a single Vicodin 5mg pill can sell for $5 each, however could easily cost $20 per pill. For those supporting their drug habit by buying the drug off the street run into financial issues quickly.

Finances are not the only aspect of life affected. Relationships, career, school, family and most that matters in life tends to suffer as a result of Vicodin dependence. The consequences are severe and the outlook only gets progressively worse if the person does not get treatment.

Seeking help for a loved one

  • Who Do I Include in a Vicodin Intervention?
    It is best to include an intervention specialist and those closest the Vicodin addicted individual. It is best to leave out anyone who may not be able to control their anger.
  • What Do I Say in A Vicodin Intervention?
    You will speak directly to your loved one, only speaking in love and concern while leaving out judgment or anger. Let him or her know the negative impact their Vicodin addiction causes you.

Vicodin Dependency

Dependence to Vicodin is a scary place to be. Dependence is similar to addiction in that the person’s life is severely altered by his or her relationships with Vicodin. The difference is that once dependent, the person seeks the drug simply to feel okay or normal and no longer experiences the high that originally got the ball rolling. When a person takes Vicodin or any painkiller, his or her body will start to develop a tolerance toward that substance. When such a tolerance is built, he or she must take a higher and higher dose in order to obtain the desired effects. Some people will start to combine Vicodin with other substances to counteract the tolerance. It is also very important to understand that combining Vicodin with other types of medication or drugs, including alcohol, creates significant risk and could possibly prove deadly.

Vicodin dependence is extremely dangerous – and expensive. On average a single Vicodin 5mg pill can sell for $5 each, however could easily cost $20 per pill. For those supporting their drug habit by buying the drug off the street run into financial issues quickly.

Finances are not the only aspect of life affected. Relationships, career, school, family and most that matters in life tends to suffer as a result of Vicodin dependence. The consequences are severe and the outlook only gets progressively worse if the person does not get treatment.

Intervention for Vicodin Abuse

Often people start taking Vicodin and when that stops working, he or she takes stronger prescription Opiates until eventually graduating to street drugs like Heroin. Though Heroin use may seem unlikely, many average people have found themselves buying such illegal drugs in an effort to maintain the habit. Recreational use can often lead to situations where a person is traumatized and continues to use in an effort to mask the increasing amount of psychological suffering.

This vicious cycle is one aspect of addiction that is difficult to break. Many abusers of Vicodin are also in strong denial as it can be obtained by prescription and is marketed as medicine. With all these working against a person, outside help is often necessary to help him or her see a way out. The best way to help a person who is caught in addiction’s vicious grasp is to get him or her to a rehab treatment center. In order for that to happen, commonly an intervention is necessary to communicate the love, support and concern to the person.

An intervention is essentially just a conversation where the person using is confronted about his or her drug use. One or more close friends or family members attend and communicate their love and concern about the situation. The combined appeal from a group often has a positive effect on the person. A professional interventionist may also be a good idea. The presence of a professional often has a calming and helpful influence on the intervention.

  • How Do I Recover from Vicodin Addiction?
    The first step in recovery from your Vicodin addiction is admitting you have a problem. Once you have done that, reach out for help and seek detoxification and treatment center.
  • Will I Ever Relapse on Vicodin?
    Vicodin relapse is always possible. As long as you learn from it and move on in a positive direction you should be fine and able to have a strong and lasting recovery in the future.
  • Can I Overdose on Vicodin?
    You can honestly overdose on any drug if it is being abused.
  • How Do I Prevent a Vicodin Overdose?
    The only way to prevent an Vicodin overdose is to stop abusing the medication. If you are prescribed Vicodin and you are taking the dosage exactly how the doctor prescribed it, you should be okay.

Recovery from Vicodin Abuse

While in the depths of addiction it can seem as though things will never be alright again. Broken relationships, health failing, and many other problems can easily overwhelm and push people to give up. This tragic aspect of addiction claims far too many every day across all states and countries. There is hope and recovery from Vicodin addiction is possible. No matter how bad things seem now, you too can recover. Millions of people have been where you are and have gone on to find a better way to live.

Most treatment centers are 12-step based because the 12-step program of recovery works and has proven itself as the best path for a better life. The better life you want and deserve is waiting for you on the other side of addiction.  Life spent free from drugs and Alcohol is amazing and full of possibilities. Break the chains of active use and join us in sobriety. Millions of people worldwide have successfully recovered as a result of the 12-steps.

All that is asked is that you genuinely try a few simple steps and listen to the suggestions of the program. Everyone is encouraged to get a sponsor, who is a clean and sober member of the program who has worked the 12-steps. Through the guidance, love and support of your local 12-step fellowship, you will certainly find a life better than your wildest dreams. No one would stay sober if life in sobriety were dull and painful. We are fun-loving people who used addictive substances to cope, to ours and others suffering. In sobriety we bring adventure, joy, happiness and a general satisfaction for life with us wherever we go.

Vicodin Use, Abuse and Dependency

Vicodin is a prescription painkiller made up of Acetaminophen, an analgesic, and Hydrocodone, a synthetic narcotic. Vicodin is physician prescribed to people who have suffered severe injuries or who are recovering from surgery. Because it combines two ingredients, it is a stronger and more dangerous drug than the sum of the danger caused by both drugs.

The Vicodin affects a person in multiple ways. Firstly, it stops neurotransmitters from emitting pain signals. Secondly, it enhances the effect of dopamine, which is a pleasure receptor. As such, people who take it feel euphoria and pleasure. The human brain is so powerful that it can create physical pain and convince a person that the drug is needed for any number of reasons. In reality, the physical pain may have subsided or be manageable without narcotic pain medications, however the person taking the drug is fully unaware of this.

Vicodin, which is Opiate based, is related to drugs like Heroin, OxyContin, or Morphine. Vicodin is highly addictive and dependency can be developed in just one week. Commonly, people start taking an Opioid for legitimate pain, but the influence over the brain takes hold and fairly quickly people are unable to stop using.

The person is presented with a serious problem. If he or she explains to the doctor that the physical problem is better but that the drug is helping so much in other ways that he or she needs more, then an ethical doctor will be unlikely to provide any. However, lie and say that the pain is still a problem and the supply continues. Little by little average, moral people convince themselves that ethical violations in order to obtain the drug are okay and ultimately necessary. In reality, this is the progression of addiction and addictive behavior and people do not get better without intervention and help.

Inevitably, the supply may run out from time to time. When this happens, a person who is addicted to Vicodin will start to detox from the drug. Withdrawal from Vicodin can be unpleasant and dangerous. Some Vicodin withdrawal effects include cravings, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, anxiety, depression, restlessness, chills, fever, bone pain, muscle pain, suicidal thoughts and behaviors. These symptoms are caused by the body acclimating to not having the drug.

Maintaining a supply and juggling doses with amount left becomes convoluted and torturous. And this is just the person using.  When one person struggles with addiction, the entire family suffers. The disease of addiction can bring everyone in the family to their breaking point.

When a family unit is struggling with a member in active addiction, there are many ways to address the problem. First involves an intervention and encouraging treatment for the addicted individual. Treatment center often provide one of the more necessary recovery tools for helping the entire group overcome the past and the addiction, namely, family therapy.

Family therapy is a great way to begin healing the whole group. All members are educated about addiction and learn about the disease and how best to avoid enabling the person addicted. A better understanding of addiction includes learning the three C’s, which are: you did not cause the addiction, you cannot control the addiction, you cannot cure the addiction. Everyone learns that addiction is an illness and not a moral failing and that recovery is the responsibility of the person who is addicted. Family therapy sessions will enable all to work through past problems and learn new, healthier ways of coping in the future.

For the person addicted to Vicodin, individual and group therapy is a crucial component to overcoming the disease of addiction. The drug abuse is often seen as a coping mechanism to mask emotional or psychological pain. Different types of individual therapy help people heal from trauma and addiction in different ways. The expert addiction counselor will put together a personal program of healing for each individual in a treatment center. This ensures that each person can focus on what is necessary for him or her.

Group therapy is a natural ally of addiction treatment as it addresses the causes of the illness and does so in such a way to encourage peer support and the formation of strong bonds. Often, isolation occurs when a person is in active addiction, which is directly combated by group therapy on many different levels. There are several different types of group therapy, a few of which are process group, educational group and experiential group. Process groups allow each individual to voice what is going on with their life and sobriety.

Educational groups provide information that furthers each person’s understanding of the disease of addiction, as well as other pertinent topics, such as co-occurring disorders and relationships. Experiential groups provide each person the chance to give and receive feedback, which gives everyone the benefit of others experience and multiple points of view.

If possible, do not take Vicodin in the first place. If you are already addicted to this drug, reach out and get the help you deserve. There is hope and recovery is possible.

  • What Will I Work on in Individual Vicodin Therapy?
    You will work on yourself. Individual Vicodin therapy focuses on bettering your life in ways you never thought were affecting you.
  • What is Individual Vicodin Therapy?
    Individual therapy is where you would meet one-on-one with a therapist in a confidential setting to talk about your Vicodin addiction.

Short-term and Long-term Effects

Taking Vicodin at all can be risky. People have become addicted even when taking the drug for a short amount of time and as directed. Use and abuse of Vicodin likely causes some of the more common side effects of the drug. Vicodin addiction tends to snowball negative consequences. Some of these signs include clouded thinking, drowsiness, lethargy, anxiety, mood changes, inability to urinate, constipation, slow heart rate and respiratory suppression, euphoria, nausea, vomiting, lack of interest, dizziness, headache, dry mouth, sweating, weakness, flushing.

Use of Vicodin for even a few days to a week can lead to tolerance, dependence and addiction. Long-term problems associated with the drug are far more serious. Chronic use of most drugs is dangerous and Vicodin is no different. Some long-term consequences of use or abuse include: kidney failure, liver failure, and diminished cognitive functioning. Extended use of Vicodin also can lead to withdrawal symptoms, tolerance, dependence and addiction, which can cause devastation and death. It is nearly unheard of for someone to take Vicodin long-term and not suffer relationship distress or serious health consequences.

Withdrawal is inevitable once physically addicted and Vicodin withdrawal can be unpleasant and dangerous. The severity of the withdrawal will depend on a number of factors, including the amount used, duration of use, physical factors, genetics, among other factors. Taking Vicodin for even a brief time can lead to deadly consequences. Far too many people started taking the drug innocently and eventually found themselves in the midst of devastation.

Vicodin and Chronic Pain

Vicodin is a highly addictive narcotic pain medication. One of the biggest trends in health in the United States is the over prescription of such narcotic pain relievers such as Vicodin. People who take prescription drugs like Vicodin for an extended period of time are the most at risk for developing dependence and addiction.

Many people are prescribed Vicodin for years as part of long-term pain management and, eventually, find that they go through withdrawal if they miss a dose or run out. It can take less than a week to develop physical dependence to the drug, however, not everyone who becomes physically dependent is thought to be addicted. Some people become addicted over time, others immediately. However, those at greatest risk of becoming addicted are people who take Vicodin on a regular basis.

A common story in addiction treatment centers starts with a serious injury or chronic pain problem. Many people are prescribed large doses of Vicodin daily for the management of pain. However, tolerance develops and a stronger narcotic pain medication is needed. People routinely increase the strength and dose of these drugs to manage these difficult pain issues. The problem develops when the mental and emotional relief the drug brings is the primary reason for seeking the prescription refills. People who become addicted may find themselves unable to stop using more and more prescription pain pills to the point where they have little effect. The tendency is to then turn to illegal versions of the Opiate, typically buying pills on the street. Then comes Heroin.

  • Will Group Therapy Help My Vicodin Addiction?
    Yes. Group therapy will show you that you are not fighting your Vicodin addiction alone.
  • What Do I Do in Vicodin Group Therapy?
    In group therapy, you will talk about your Vicodin addiction and relate with others’ battle with their addiction.

Fighting Vicodin

Breana’s life went downhill when she watched her mother pass away at 13 years old. She began experimenting with drugs, and it ended up taking everything from her. She was homeless, afraid and alone wondering what her life has become. She ended up getting pregnant and got on a Vicodin program that didn’t help her recover, but rather, it made things worse. Her child was taken by CPS and she was heartbroken. It took some time, but Breana fought the battle of addiction and won. She is now living a clean and sober life with her daughter right by her side. If Breana can recover, you can too.

Find out More about your available options today  866 578-7471

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Seeking help for a loved one

  • Why Should I go to Inpatient Treatment for My Vicodin Addiction?
    You should go to inpatient treatment to save your life from Vicodin addiction. You will learn a new, healthier way of life while in inpatient rehabilitation.
  • Why Should I Attend Inpatient Rehab?
    You should attend inpatient rehab for your Vicodin addiction so you can learn how to live your life in a positive way without the use of drugs.

Inpatient Vicodin Rehab

Inpatient rehab is the best way to start recovering from narcotic pain medication addiction. Traditionally, the programs range from 30, 60 or 90 days, however all are different and some offer much longer or shorter options. Residential facilities provide around the clock care and unparalleled support to clients. Clients can stay with others in the same situation as themselves.

Inpatient programs lend the best results for lasting recovery. Inpatient treatment offers individual, group and family therapy to help the clients identify the underlying causes of their addiction and learn better ways to handle stress and triggers. Expert counselors work one on one with clients in individual therapy sessions. Often, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, CBT, is used to help the individual identify negative and self-destructive thought patterns and replace them with more positive and productive ones. Group and family sessions help people learn better ways to live and understand the mistakes of the past.

Group members give and receive feedback, allowing everyone to benefit from the group’s collective experiences. Additionally, educational groups and seminars provide critical insight into the nature of the disease of addiction and how science and other experts have come to overcome its devastating symptoms. Other benefits to attending an inpatient treatment program are the added therapeutic approaches offered, such as yoga, meditation, equine therapy, art therapy and more. Inpatient is the best option for overcoming Vicodin addiction and dependency.

Outpatient Vicodin Rehab

Outpatient programs are sometimes attended following a stay in an inpatient program, or as a stand-alone treatment. Outpatient treatment is typically reserved for people who have already detoxed off Vicodin and have stabilized. With this type of program, the individual is given more freedom and more responsibility. This works for some people but others would do better to start with an inpatient program.

Consult a medical professional to help you find the program that will work best for you. Outpatient programs often offer individual and group therapy. Individual therapy will be like inpatient in that the same therapeutic techniques are utilized. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is a favorite of addiction therapists due to its effectiveness in treating the disease. Look for a program that offers family therapy. Family sessions allow the entire family unit to heal from the devastation and trauma that addiction often causes. Family members will have a chance to learn about the disease of addiction from those who studied the area for years.

Family support and encouragement is a huge bonus for anyone starting down the path to recovery. Finding a place that addresses the entire group is a plus. Most programs encourage concurrent 12-step meeting attendance, which is a good sign that the program is invested in its clients and aims to keep them accountable. 12-step meetings provide the support and guidance people need to find the better way of living. 12-step meetings exist across the globe and are a life-long, free source of continued support and comradery.

  • Will Outpatient Help my Vicodin Addiction?
    Just like inpatient, if you are willing to do what it takes to recover, outpatient rehab will help you learn how to live your life without Vicodin.
  • When Should I go to Outpatient Rehab?
    Following up your inpatient treatment with outpatient rehab can help provide you with a better chance at Vicodin recovery.

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