Signs and Symptoms of Adderall Use in the Workplace

Signs and Symptoms of Adderall Use in the Workplace

July 4th, 2015 in Adderall Addiction Rehabilitation
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Athletes use steroids to boost their performance in an athletic setting. Americans continue to work longer hours, take less time off, and are still pushed to work harder and get more done. It shouldn’t be a surprise, that the working class has turned to its own kind of steroid, Adderall. While it’s widely known that Adderall is abused by college students looking for extra focus and longer study sessions, it is less known that it has now infiltrated the working world as well. For the brain to work at its best capability, it needs enough sleep, little stress and light exercise. The average working American is lucky to get one out of three, yet is expected to be more productive than in recent history. Adderall when used outside of it’s prescribed reason creates hyper focus regardless of the amount of sleep or stress level of the user. Allowing the worker to be more productive without needing the three things listed above.

Workplace Adderall Abuse Long-term Effects

There is a reason the athletic community frowns on steroid use, and it is not just because of the unfair advantage. There are health concerns with drug use, that includes the use of Adderall. It may seem like a harmless prescription drug to use for heightened productivity, but long term abuse can come with some pretty nasty side effects such as weakening of your arms and legs, and seizures. Because it is made with amphetamine it can also be addictive and overtime a tolerance will build up, meaning more pills will be needed to get the same affect. With more and more people in the workplace using stimulants, the more employers are going to expect that level of productivity. Which is am unrealistic goal for most people without drugs like Adderall.

What Can Employers Do About Adderall Abuse At Work ?

Tod Essig, a contributor to Forbes, who specializes in health and wellness stated, “Rather than the slower-acting sustainable benefits of wellness, many reach again for the stimulant (medication) they used back in (college), or that someone they know uses.

“They enter a downward spiral away from productive wellness that can be tough to break.”

Employers need to stop turning a blind eye to the abuse of Adderall by their employees. Granted not all of them know of this growing problem, or that some of their employees are abusing stimulants in order to keep up with the work load. Like Essig said, we have to take the time to see the slower-acting sustainable benefits, such as a little exercise, getting a good night sleep, eating healthy and de-stressing. Many adults don’t have those coping skill worked in to their schedule. That being said, the culture in the American work place needs to be changed as well. Overworked, over stimulated employees might be good for the bottom line in the short term, but those employees will burn out. Employers need to see the dangers of pushing their employees too hard and come up with responsible, realistic goals.

 

 

 

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